Monday, December 06, 2004

Group Blog

Over the course of finding and commenting on articles about North Korea it seems that what we have learned that the government has increased its momentum in resolving the threat by North Korea. From the United States led Naval exercise that sent a clear message to North Korea to China joining our side indicate the United States’ approach to the North Korea situation has become a bigger concern. The United States has demonstrated a strict zero tolerance policy towards the trafficking of weapons of mass destruction. From our initial to our final article, the concern of North Korea by many Americans is now still a big concern but is slowly approaching a lessened threat from the increased involvement by our government in North Korea. The concern of people’s concern with our government having little regard towards North Korea has also changed for from our actions the momentum change has shown our highest regard to North Korea’s threat. Although there still needs a lot to be done over there in terms of finding the men who are teaching English to the North Korea military which in turn they are creating spies out of those military men who have learned our language. SO North Korea still has a lot to be done but from out increased involvement and persistence to surround North Korea with allies has shown that we have this momentum and attitude to do whatever is needed to resolve this issue. The last event that solidified this momentum was us gaining China’s support to our effort which helps in our effort to surround and pose a threat to North Korea instead of the other way around. With the help of China and our increased talks among Japan, Russia, China, and South Korea it seems as if our momentum has increased and is headed in the right direction in terms of resolving the threat of North Korea.

Group Blog

Over the course of finding and commenting on articles about North Korea it seems that what we have learned that the government has increased its momentum in resolving the threat by North Korea. From the United States led Naval exercise that sent a clear message to North Korea to China joining our side indicate the United States’ approach to the North Korea situation has become a bigger concern. The United States has demonstrated a strict zero tolerance policy towards the trafficking of weapons of mass destruction. From our initial to our final article, the concern of North Korea by many Americans is now still a big concern but is slowly approaching a lessened threat from the increased involvement by our government in North Korea. The concern of people’s concern with our government having little regard towards North Korea has also changed for from our actions the momentum change has shown our highest regard to North Korea’s threat. Although there still needs a lot to be done over there in terms of finding the men who are teaching English to the North Korea military which in turn they are creating spies out of those military men who have learned our language. SO North Korea still has a lot to be done but from out increased involvement and persistence to surround North Korea with allies has shown that we have this momentum and attitude to do whatever is needed to resolve this issue. The last event that solidified this momentum was us gaining China’s support to our effort which helps in our effort to surround and pose a threat to North Korea instead of the other way around. With the help of China and our increased talks among Japan, Russia, China, and South Korea it seems as if our momentum has increased and is headed in the right direction in terms of resolving the threat of North Korea.

Tuesday, November 30, 2004

Group Blog

Over the course of finding and commenting on articles about North Korea it seems that what we have learned that the government has increased its momentum in resolving the threat by North Korea. From the United States led Naval exercise that sent a clear message to North Korea to China joining our side indicate the United States’ approach to the North Korea situation has become a bigger concern. The United States has demonstrated a strict zero tolerance policy towards the trafficking of weapons of mass destruction. From our initial to our final article, the concern of North Korea by many Americans is now still a big concern but is slowly approaching a lessened threat from the increased involvement by our government in North Korea. The concern of people’s concern with our government having little regard towards North Korea has also changed for from our actions the momentum change has shown our highest regard to North Korea’s threat. Although there still needs a lot to be done over there in terms of finding the men who are teaching English to the North Korea military which in turn they are creating spies out of those military men who have learned our language. SO North Korea still has a lot to be done but from out increased involvement and persistence to surround North Korea with allies has shown that we have this momentum and attitude to do whatever is needed to resolve this issue. The last event that solidified this momentum was us gaining China’s support to our effort which helps in our effort to surround and pose a threat to North Korea instead of the other way around. With the help of China and our increased talks among Japan, Russia, China, and South Korea it seems as if our momentum has increased and is headed in the right direction in terms of resolving the threat of North Korea.

Sunday, November 28, 2004

Blog #6 - Dan Grigoras

Ever since the North Korea – US relations took a turn for the worst in the 90s, peoples all over the world have lived in fear of what the next step might be in ameliorating the situation. The article Nicole posted, “S.Korea Says North Should Seize Summit Momentum” describes the plan of action proposed by Bush which might be a possible resolution to the situation. Bush recently met with foreign leaders around the world to discuss the possibility of restating the allied offers of security guarantees and economic and energy assistance once North Korea commits to a process of dismantling its nuclear arms programs. South Korea is prepared to make similar negotiations with the country. According to Foreign Minister Ban Ki-moon, the "Coordinated steps means that when North Korea commits themselves to give up their nuclear development program, then our side will be prepared to provide some provisional security assurances together with energy assistance." Weather or not North Korea chooses to accept this compromise is another matter however. The US and North Korea shared a similar commitment in the 90s which the US backed out of and began this nuclear tension. North Korea could favor compensation for the lost years or spitefully request more benefits before agreeing to the proposal. It could take a while before negotiations are set and North Korea finally agrees to get rid of their nuclear weapons. Very rarely are negotiations settled after first proposal.

Talks

The Clinton administration took what is the wrong approach in many Republicans view. This was the reason the Bush Administration did not follow the bargain Clinton had with Korea. The President is the person in charge, and what he says goes. The Cabinet is the people advising the President. John Kerry might have been right for criticizing Bush, because that could also been taken as a flip-flop. The Kerry campaign sure had been accused of over that throughout these past few months. The Bush Administration changed the direction of the Program to a long-term solution, while Clinton had tried to buy the North Koreans away. The Bush Administration saw this and changed its approach to involve many of the countries surround North Korea, and forcing them to be 'peaceful.' Colin Powell and the President are allowed to disagree, but that is what is good for the American government. The balance of power and the voting populous are allowed to have differences. The difference in opinion does not look good for America though. It is bad policy to have an ambassador say one thing and then public ally take back the policy. It is strange how things work in Washington, and I am not sure that it would have been good to have a change of leadership in the middle of this war on terrorism. This was very vital win for the war on terrorism to continue. With a Kerry victory, we would run the risk of pulling out of Iraq 'cold turkey' that would have talking away the loss of every American life in Iraq. North Korea is next on the war on terror and it is important the Bush and the soon to be secretary of state Rice must work out their differences in a non-public stage.

Monday, November 22, 2004

response to dans article

i think this article confirms what the world was fearing: that north korea's threats of nuclear weapons was not empty, they have the artillery and seem unafraid to share their plans with us. there seems its possible to have an easy resolution to this entire fiasco, yet somehow nothing is being done. both sides keep going back and forth, making threats of terrorism. i dont see how this is helping anything, since it seems the whole situation could be settled, not easily, but settled somewhat soon. north korea is not asking something impossible of us, just to follow through on what we originally said we would. at the same time, north korea should not stop going to the peace talks with the 5 other nations, they should stop being hypocritical and promote peace as they are asking us to do. i think north korea is being quite extreme with this issue, using nuclear weapons to get other countries to accept your government is definately not the way i would personally handle things. what this country is doing is utterly ridiculous, and even though i know this threatening behavior must stop, i think all countries involved should attend all the peace conferences and put in a lot of true effort to disarm north korea.

North Korea talks

South Korea's top diplomat discussed that North Korea better get on top of the ball and be careful because of the increased the talks between China, Japan, Russia, South Korea, and the United States. So by hopefully these increased talks it will spark talks with North Korea and their involvement in nuclear weapons. Like from my last article I do believe Bush is moving in the right direction, from China being on our side and this article explaining the increased talks among the countries. Above all else this seems to be a jump start for diplomatic talks and hopefully a peaceful resolution between the United States and it allies and North Korea. This momentum that is on Bush's needs to keep rolling and hopefully soon resolve this issue from continual talks among everybody. Just among the United States, China, and South Korea it is good to see that North Korea is a top priority on everyone's list and will be handled properly. Hopefully that the proposals submitted by everyone will be taken seriously and into deep consideration so that North Korea's power will be taken away along with their threat. Like I said in my last article with the addition of China siding on our side and just the momentum created there along with the confirmation of South Korea and there desired interest to keep North Korea from power creates a huge momentum factor for the United States. If more countries continue to join in and surround North Korea will be huge. So hopefully this momentum will continue and be beneficial to handling the North Korea situation.

North Korea Blog

Although an older article it does hit at some key issues on the topic of North Korea and Bush's stance on this issue. Basically the history behind this issue is that the Clinton Administration had diplomatic talks with North Korea and made a deal with them to freeze their nuclear proliferation of these weapons. Then those talks ended and now North Korea has 4 to 7 nuclear weapons. The argument against this is that the CIA confirmed that there had already been a few nuclear weapons produced before Bush took office and that there has been no confirmation on whether more have been produced. Another thing that Bush came back with is that they have been talking with China in joining an alliance to help push North Korea out of power. Well at that time this had not happened yet and as I was searching for articles this week I came upon one from November 20th that said that China did side with us. So in terms of what Bush is doing I think he is heading in the right direction in terms of handling Korea. I mean I am no foreign policy buff in any means but so far it seems like he is doing the right thing. And hopefully these improvements will continue to occur and sooner or later take the threat away from North Korea that it still has now. This is such a big issue that if things continue to got the way in which we got China to join our side then I think this will be resolved and some sort resolution will take place.

Article

The Choice on North Korea

Monday, October 4, 2004; Page A22

ONE OF THE substantive surprises of Thursday's presidential debate was the detailed exchange between President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry on the critical but neglected subject of North Korea. Prodded by moderator Jim Lehrer, Mr. Bush touted and Mr. Kerry attacked the current U.S. diplomatic strategy for preventing North Korea from becoming a nuclear weapons power. Somewhat esoteric references to "six party" vs. "bilateral" talks and plutonium vs. uranium processing soon were flying back and forth, probably leaving a lot of viewers wondering what the difference was. Here's how we'd sum it up: Mr. Kerry faults Mr. Bush for undoing the diplomacy of the Clinton administration with respect to North Korea and intends to respond by undoing, in turn, what has been accomplished by President Bush.

Let's start with Mr. Kerry's indictment. The Clinton team painstakingly negotiated a deal under which North Korea supposedly froze its nuclear program and international inspectors monitored its known supply of spent nuclear fuel rods. North Korea received energy supplies from the West, and at the end of 2000, U.S. and North Korean officials were discussing a larger bargain concerning its weapons programs. In 2001 Secretary of State Colin L. Powell announced that the talks would continue, only to be publicly contradicted by Mr. Bush in front of the South Korean president. Two years then passed without negotiations: As Mr. Kerry put it, "while they didn't talk at all, the fuel rods came out, the inspectors came out . . . and today, there are four to seven nuclear weapons in the hands of North Korea."

___ More in This Series ___


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The Choice on Iraq


The Choice on Immigration

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_____Today's Post Editorials_____

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Some truth-squadding is needed here: While the CIA concluded that North Korea may have built one or two nuclear weapons before Mr. Bush took office, and while U.S. intelligence agencies believe the fuel rods have been reprocessed into plutonium, there is no certainty that North Korea has built more nuclear weapons. To say so is to make the same sort of reach that Mr. Kerry faults Mr. Bush for making in his statements about Iraq's nuclear program. Nevertheless, the senator is right about the policy failures. In part because it has been paralyzed by internal feuding between hawks who favor "regime change" and advocates of negotiations, the Bush administration has been feckless in facing the North Korean threat.

Mr. Bush made two points in his defense. One is that President Bill Clinton's deal with North Korea collapsed after Pyongyang was caught cheating: While "freezing" its plutonium, it was secretly pursuing another bomb program based on enriched uranium. The other is that despite an overall diplomatic stalemate the Bush administration has succeeded in persuading China -- a neighbor that arguably has more leverage over North Korea than the United States -- to join a five-nation alliance that commonly seeks disarmament. It is this innovation that Mr. Kerry would undo. He says he would return to the bilateral negotiations pursued by the Clinton administration.

Mr. Kerry says his strategy would make room for China, too. But Mr. Bush's prediction is probably right: As soon as the United States agrees to bilateral talks, the North Korean regime will refuse further sessions of the "six party" negotiations that have been underway, relieving China, South Korea, Japan and Russia of responsibility for pressuring Pyongyang and leaving the United States to make a deal alone. Lacking the tools of China -- which controls North Korea's energy supplies and could cause its regime to collapse simply by loosening border controls -- the United States would once again face the choice of offering distasteful bribes to a murderous dictatorship or threatening an almost unthinkable war. Mr. Bush doesn't have a good record on North Korea, but he has mapped a possible way out of this difficult bind -- assuming, that is, that a diplomatic solution is possible. Apart from purely partisan motivations, Mr. Kerry's rejection of it makes little sense.

Sunday, November 21, 2004

Response to the Rueters Article

I think that this article said that talks were beginning again after the US election had been finalized and the East Asian countries would know the general direction of the US talks. This article showed nothing bad or good was in the future. It seemed like the article was saying that nothing was happening. It does look very similar to the Iraq situation. We threatened many times for them to disarm, but the North Koreans are very stubborn. This cannot be resolved in the same manor as Iraq because China is no pushover. The North Koreans were likely hoping for Kerry's election as his talks with them would be meaningless. Bush kept the momentum going in the talks as he put the plans back into action by both the US and South Korean policies implemented on the North Koreans plans for disarming and losing their nuclear power. The whole situation seems to be very slow as the United States concentrates its interest in resolving the Iraqi conflict before it gets too deep into the North Korean situation. The North Korean news will be front page once the press becomes bored with Iraq. The talks were positive as the South Koreans, Colin Powell, and the North Koreans proposed their plans and were making progress to their goals in the situation. The longer this process is dragged out the more North Korea benefits from the time. With more time, they are better able to develop their nuclear technology and are able to discover better methods of hiding their weapons as well.

North Korea Resolution

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=reutersEdge&storyID=6877000

It seems as though there is a possibility that their might be a resolution in store for North Korea. After top officials from all over including President Bush meet in seems like they have a better grasp on what they are planning to do to resolve their problem with North Koreas nuclear missiles. The meeting gave them the chance to jump start there planning and hopefully this diplomatic effort will make a favorable situation that North Korea will agree with. It seems like this opportunity is the best one that North Korea has and hopefully they will take full advantage of. All that needs to be done is for the top officials from all other to continue their talks and keep all of this momentum going. President Bush and the South Korean President have also had many talks and these two allies are forming a common opinion on the problem in North Korea. Both agree that this is a high priority issue and they need to keep up the pace. Although Bush has been criticized for naming North Korea as an “axis of evil” he has been planning on was to resolve the issue. With his last months in office Colin Powell has even taken the time to cite three proposals that are all flexible and realistic. Hopefully with all the new negotiating going one their will be a peaceful resolution sometime in the neat future.

Reponse to article

North Korea as we know is already a big nuclear threat because of the amount of weapons they currently possess. The United States knows they are a threat but I think that this issue needs to really be addressed because it is getting to be very severe. North Korea already stated that they in fact are planning to strengthen their “nuclear deterrent” because they feel as though the United States are planning an act on their state. Although we know America does not have such malicious intention, it seems as though the Korean government believes that instead of trying to peacefully resolve this problem the Americans they stooped to preparing a surprise attack upon their nation. It is already very clear that no matter which way the United States plans to deal with this growing problem, North Korea will just continue to strengthen their nuclear weapons and build them up as a huge threat to the United States. It seems as though there is only one resolution possible which sounds much easier than it actually is and that is if the Unites States aggress to guarantee a nonaggression pact, economic aid, and that they will no longer interfere with their communist form of life then and only then will North Korea agree to give up their nuclear weapons program. It looks as though a resolution for our country and North Korea may be far away but we just need to keep faith that in the end this problem will no longer exist.

Thursday, November 18, 2004

Blog #5 & Article Link - Dan Grigoras

http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=3763587

The North Korea situation isn’t a discomfort just for the United States. The article “North Korea Threatens to Increase Nuclear Deterrent” presents how the current nuclear threats presented by North Korea are feared all around the globe, including the great people of Scotland. According to the Scotsman.com website, “North Korea has 8,000 spent nuclear fuel rods which could yield enough plutonium for several bombs, when reprocessed with chemicals. North Korean diplomats have recently claimed the country had “weaponised” the material” and goes on to mention that South Korea believes their Northern counterpart has enough plutonium for two or three bombs of mass destruction. If this information is just partially accurate it denotes reasonable suspicion for further investigating North Korea and attempting peaceful negotiations. North Korea said there is a possibility for peace without war if the Untied States abandoned its goal of “toppling the communist regime.” This seems like a pretty decent proposal from North Korea to the United States. In the beginning, the United States was the first to break the contract between the two countries that prevented dispute. Now North Korea is willing to give up its nuclear weapons and facilities if the United States provides some type of guarantee they supply North Korea with economic aid, and stop involving themselves with human rights in their regime, which was the original agreement between the two countries. It’s interesting to witness what another country has to say about the United States and our approach on the nuclear situation in North Korea. Perhaps taking into account the good of the rest of the world before making any major decisions to move into North Korea would be a good attitude to tackle the nuclear problem.

Tuesday, November 16, 2004

response to article

this article dealt with an american who escaped from vietnam to north korea during the war. in the last 39 years, he has spent his time teaching english to military officers and appearing in propaganda films. jenkins is telling the US government that he has inside knowledge into how the north korean government uses foreign aid to spy for them. there are other americans who also might have defected to north korea during the time of vietnam, and all parties had been allowed to marry european women who were being held in north korea. interestingly enough, Jenkin's wife is japanese, and she was brought to north korea during the 70's or 80's, a time when north korea was "snatching" random citizens from japan. jenkins is cooperating with our government to work through this cause, and i think this article is just another perfect example of north korea and it's weird ways. the fact that north korea spent two decades stealing people from other countries with no cause just creeps me out. i think this article just goes to show north korea and how its starving for power.